Bare Meteor vs Proxy Server Deployment


#1

Many frameworks and languages provide a development server to use (during development, of course) to test your app, as you go (e.g. Python, Yii, Rails (I think), etc), as I’m sure most developers are aware.

I know the docs say that Meteor “is a full-application server,” but I just read the following article, which made me want to confirm:
Is it intended that production apps be deployed using Meteor’s built-in server (i.e. meteor run --port whateverPort)? I should point out, I’m not referring to deploying apps on meteor.com; just to deploying in general using Meteor’s internal server vs using a proxy server, such as Nginx, to forward requests to Meteor.

http://joshowens.me/modulus-vs-heroku-vs-digital-ocean/

Also, that question occurred to me because I’m in the process of setting up a Digital Ocean “droplet” for Meteor to use in development, but since I’ve heard such good things about Digital Ocean, if things go well in development, I’ll use them when my apps go into production, also.

So, does anyone have any tips / gotchas / things to look out for with regard to deploying on Digital Ocean, specifically? I read that they’re more hands-on than most cloud hosting providers. I’m fine with that – I have a decent amount of Linux server admin experience, but I’ve never administered a Meteor app, or any type of Node.js app. Thanks!


#2

Is it intended that production apps be deployed using Meteor’s built-in server (i.e. meteor run --port whateverPort)?

No, you use meteor build and launch it like a node application. But I guess MUP would be the easiest way to deploy an application.


#3

That is flat-out awesome. Thanks!