From a beginner's perspective-


#1

Hi all :thumbsup:
I’m somewhat new to web development, so I figured I’d go ahead and send a post out on here to get my feet wet with with interacting.

I also figure it could be useful for the community to see things from the angle of someone without a lot of dev experience (though people may want to avoid associating Meteor with the stigma of a beginner’s framework).

I was trying out ROR, as well as inspecting all of the various JS platforms that are out there (holy f*ck can that be a bit overwhelming for a novice). I am getting into web dev, as like many others, because I have some ideas for web apps (education related). ROR was certainly useful to get my feet wet with web frameworks, and the documentation/tutorials made it really approachable. However, this new paradigm for “asynchronous”, or from a layman’s perspective “real-time”, is totally obvious and opens so many doors for interactive apps.

From what I’ve read, Meteor seems to get a lot of hate as being “future-dependent”, and critics compare it to Apple, suggesting that by providing the entire framework, it is babying devs or dumbing things down. But is this really a bad thing? Apple, regardless of your outlook on it, is so successful because of its ability to bring technology towards the mainstream. So I think elitists want to bet against Meteor because they don’t like the idea of opening the doors to those who are less tech-savy. We should just hope that it goes with the “easy to learn, complex to master” mantra.

What makes me think Meteor is really awesome, is the fact that by attempting to provide an all encompassing solution, we are now able to acquire the input and ideas from people who would rather use technology as a means to an end, and not necessarily just for the means itself. And I think by enabling these types of people, you’re opening yourself up applications with a lot of utility, since these people may have more experience with the environments that need innovation.

I am looking forward to learning the ropes, and hope that I am able to stay with this framework as it matures. If we’re lucky, we can ride the… er… large wave that it makes on impact (clever marketing guys). I have a special place in my heart for projects like this, and it seems like the community is really passionate, which is inspiring.

From a beginner’s perspective- I do hope that the Meteor team is able to make the framework stable enough to support a seamless UX. I notice a lot of sites have flickering while loading, and even now, when I scroll up and down, the page behind this text box is scrolled, instead of this frame (at some point it fixed itself, not sure why though). And pressing tab does not induce a tab. There are so many small things that make a web app feel seamless- going “back” is a great example. I’ve yet to see a JS app that returns to the area of the page that you were at before going forward (*edit, should have checked this forum, it did). Or god forbid, we have the “clicking back just reloads the page” issue (though I’m sure there are workarounds for making this all look seamless). From a beginner’s perspective, I do hope the Meteor team is not only successful in making this a paradigm shifting asynchronous full framework, but I hope they give small-team devs the tools to iron out the small kinks, so that users can have their asynchronous cake and eat it on a smooth, coherent plate.
All the best!


#2

Welcome @wavo89,
nice to meet you man.

Being a frontend-dev/designer myself i can totally relate.

I know and love my html, css and javascript and i really enjoy coding things up.
I took a few looks at ruby, php, sql and so on and it felt very uncomfortable to me.

Then Meteor came along and it was like a breth of fresh air.
Suddenly I could write an entire app with the languages i feel most comfortable in.
That felt very empowering. :smile:

It’s still much to learn, but im hooked.

Not sure if it helps you, but this tutorial got me off the ground pretty quickly:

Might be worth checking out.


#3

Nice to meet you as well. Thanks for the reference- I’ll be sure to check it out.
I agree, it definitely feels empowering. Being able to reduce the amount of interplay between languages with different rules and practices gives a lot more confidence to the developer and let’s you see over the horizon a lot easier.


#4

Welcome to the community! Web development can be very overwhelming if you’re just starting out. I’m pretty new to meteor myself (2 months), fairly new to web dev (1 yr) and have been doing desktop/server stuff for 8 yrs. Even for me, I’ve spent most of my time reading blogs, watching tuts, asking questions here and stackoverflow and answering them too (you learn alot more when you answer questions and someone else corrects you ;))
I feel that this is a great time to be joining meteor as a beginner and I think you’ve picked the right ship to sail with! Then again, I’m pretty biased hehe.


#5

I would like to add my newbie perspective.
I am just a part time developer, I started of with php a few years back, but had been looking for something more slick, I also tried hands on ROR and liked what I saw, but when I discovered angularJS and the wealth of packages available on npm, it got me interested on the MEAN stack.
I struggled to find my feet with meanjs and mean.io, spent a lot of time to get anything even started.

Then I discovered meteor, Voila, within a day I could get as much done as would take me (not speaking for anyone else) a few days on ROR or MEAN.

Although there are some rough edges, so far I am loving Meteor. for me the best feature is the simplicity and ease of development it offers. coming from a sync background, only Meteor helped me easily grasp an async approach.


#6

Welcome to the Meteor community!

I think you’ve hit the nail on the head when you suggest that Meteor is an enabler for people with great ideas to realise them quickly. There are lots of amazing, production apps built on Meteor out there. I wonder how many would have made their presence felt without Meteor!

However, you make the following point (I think about this site):

You probably weren’t aware, but this site is not a Meteor app. It’s Discourse.


#7

From what I’ve read, Meteor seems to get a lot of hate as being “future-dependent”, and critics compare it to Apple, suggesting that by providing the entire framework, it is babying devs or dumbing things down.

Nothing wrong with criticism. If it would be based on facts. Haven’t seen the features of 1.2 in the current version yet and I am pretty sure Meteor depends on some elements that aren’t made by the MDG - NodeJS, MongoDB. If it would be about supporting other databases, heck I see a market for 3rd parties (it’s open source after all…). Dumbing things down is a time saver. It is called an less steep learning curve for less experienced developers. So, I disagree with those critics in that regard.

What makes me think Meteor is really awesome, is the fact that by attempting to provide an all encompassing solution…(continued)

There is a lot more. Like Fibers, Reactivity and the benefits of One Language. So you can add innovation, pioneering and more to what Meteor brings to the world.

From a beginner’s perspective- I do hope that the Meteor team is able to make the framework stable enough to support a seamless UX. I notice a lot of sites have flickering while loading, and even now, when I scroll up and down, the page behind this text box is scrolled, instead of this frame (at some point it fixed itself, not sure why though).

A great platform doesn’t guarantee great application designers. Philosophy and methodologies are key here. Most glitches and UX party crashers are by (bad) design or ambitions to go live too soon. Just because you can build a reactive, realtime superapp in a day, means its design and development should be done that way. Luckily Meteor is gracious to embrace such philosophies. Like TDD/BDD. Like this awesome forum. You can’t blame meteor for browser vendors not following standards and conventions :wink:

I am also new to the Meteor scene, have some experience with Rails. Having a blast since I got to play with this stuff. Haven’t touched Rails since. Welcome to the forum!