Moving DB from Compose to MongoLab


#1

Anybody gone through this?

Side note: Currently using galaxy for hosting.


#2

Out of curiosity. Why are you making this transition?


#3

No issues with Compose, but it isn’t a production website just an example app. The price is kind of steep. Although, alternatively, I may try to pile on multiple apps into one compose subscription.


#4

Ah. Well I’ve only ever used mongorestore from a dump on a local db. But the process was pretty painless and I imagine it is similar.
Here’s some docs that will show you how. https://docs.mongodb.com/manual/tutorial/backup-and-restore-tools/


#5

I think you mean mlab (former known as MongoLab). We are hosted there. It should be pretty straighforward. Just setup your db then restore your dump

http://blog.mlab.com/2014/07/tutorial-scaling-meteor-with-mongodb-oplog-tailing/


#6

I’ve been looking for mongo hosting… they have a free plan, and start out from $15 – not bad. I was dreading going with Compose due to the price.

I’ll sign up now and give their service a try.

It says on their website:

Starting September 27 at 10:00 am PDT / 5:00 pm UTC, we’ll be upgrading all free Sandbox plan databases running MongoDB 3.0 to MongoDB 3.2 and all for-pay Shared plan databases running MongoDB 2.6 to MongoDB 3.0.

How will this work if we’re not on 1.4 in the case of Mongo 3.2?

Also, I can get to my database on mlab from MongoChef – I’m all set.

Thanks!


#7

what version are you running? If planning to use the shared plan, MongoDB 3.0 has been supported since Meteor 1.1


#8

We’ve been hosting on mlab’s shared plan for the for the past 10 months–at 4.8 GB it was costing us around $80 per month. Sometimes we very sluggish data loading issues, which I assume are just the nature of a shared hosting plan. We’re switching their dedicated plan today to determine if we notice a performance gain. Shared plan is probably a great plan to start with if you have a very small budget. $160 seems reasonable for the dedicated plan (40 GB of storage). But it’s too bad there isn’t a cheaper dedicated plan.


#9

When you consider I can deploy mongo local to my Meteor instance on my EC2 box, and it comes with 8gb of storage and I can throw 4gb of ram at it, it’s very performant, and it’s all less than $40 a month, it’s hard to pony up for these “remote” mongo services.


#10

Thing to remember is that with these remote services you are usually getting a replica set and backups included, hosting your own on 1 server that is usually not that efficient and really only best done if you have a server per instance you want to run (minimum 3 for a replica set). Mind, you could use docker to segregate multiple instances on one box, but you still have the issue of a single point of failure for all your data.


#11

But from what I’ve read, all these remote mongo services are just a lot slower.


#12

Usually only the free tiers, and if you have high I/O on their shared plans. Their dedicated plans are usually very responsive. I’ve run smaller applications with up to 100 people on mLab’s shared hosting and never had an issue, though I only had a moderate I/O.